Thunderpig’s Mirror

Archive for the ‘science’ Category

Record Setting Chill in Anchorage This Summer; Global Temperature Continue Decline

Posted by Thunder Pig on July 27, 2008

The coldest summer ever? You might be looking at it, weather folks say. Right now the so-called summer of ‘08 is on pace to produce the fewest days ever recorded in which the temperature in Anchorage managed to reach 65 degrees.
That unhappy record was set in 1970, when we only made it to the 65-degree mark, which many Alaskans consider a nice temperature, 16 days out of 365.This year, however — with the summer more than half over — there have been only seven 65-degree days so far. And that’s with just a month of potential “balmy” days remaining and the forecast looking gloomy.

Source: Watt’s Up With That?

it’s been a cool summer here in my valley…I have yet to turn on my air conditioning this summer, and several mornings have been in the upper 40’s, forcing me to wear a jacket on my way to the office.

And I guess this would be a good time to point out the July Update on Global Temperature that came out a couple of days ago (and duly shared via my Google Reader) that shows a continued cooling trend. While June was the 9th warmest June on record, it was part of a trend of ever cooler Junes after the peak in 1998. You won’t hear the fear mongering Legacy Media report that fact.

I am also working on adding a Climate News section to West Carolina Report, and an RSS Feed to go with it.

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Posted in Climate, Global Ice Age, science, weather | 2 Comments »

July 20, 1969 "The Eagle Has Landed"

Posted by Thunder Pig on July 20, 2008

Apollo 11 was the first manned mission to land on the Moon. The first steps by humans on another planetary body were taken by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on July 20, 1969. The astronauts also returned to Earth the first samples from another planetary body. Apollo 11 achieved its primary mission – to perform a manned lunar landing and return the mission safely to Earth – and paved the way for the Apollo lunar landing missions to follow.
Find out more at Apollo 11.

Here’s how we’ll return to the Moon, this time to stay!

Posted in Exploration, history, Human Spacefilght, NASA, science | Leave a Comment »

Time Lapse: The Southern Lights

Posted by Thunder Pig on July 14, 2008

Time-lapse footage of the Aurora Australis, or Southern Lights.
This is the Southern Hemisphere equivalent of the Aurora Borealis or Northern Lights.
Filmed during the Antarctic winter in the general vicinity of McMurdo Station and Scott Base, where the sun is below the horizon for 4 months of the year.
Most of the individual clips here were each taken over about a 10 minute period to give you an idea of how much they were moving in real time.

Source: Frostbytes

I have some local time lapse footage to put up, and while I was researching methods of converting my material into a video, I ran across this. One day, I’d like to see aurora in the sky first hand. That would be cool.

Posted in entertainment, science, weather | Leave a Comment »

Graphing Temperatures and Counting Sunspots

Posted by Thunder Pig on July 4, 2008

There are many people tracking what may be the beginning of a new temperture trend…downward. Among them, comes this report:

The latest UAH anomaly is -0.114. On the heels of a -0.183 reading for May, this is the steppest 2-month negative anomaly since Sept/Oct 1993. It’s the lowest 3-month anomaly since 1997. The latest reading gives 10 consecutive year-over-year anomalies that are lower than previous year. The last such stretch was in the period beginning May 1999. The negative trend line goes back to July 1997 – exactly 11 years.

 That comes from Digital Diatribes, who does yeoman’s work on tracking numbers, building spreadsheets and graphs.

And from another Digital Warrior, comes this graph:

The graph plots the long term trend [1st order curve in blue] against the short term trend [5th order curve in red].

The long term trend line is simply a first-order curve [line] from the beginning temperature to the ending temperature, and it treats all the ups and downs in between as random noise, and the short term trend takes into account more of the data using a fifth-order curve; and is one of the form fx5 + ex4 + dx3 + cx2 + bx + a, and is much more robust for fitting temperature trends.

The fifth-order curve is a leading indicator that can indicate the future direction of the first-order curve. Of course, my bet is that the Global Warming Religionists will simply move their beginning plot back to the Little Ice Age like some of the commenters have suggested.
Since no one seems to be plotting the moving averages of the data like I do for stock prices, I wonder if there would be any utility in doing that.

I still remember the predictions by NASA that Solar Cycle 24 was going to be “one of the most intense cycles since record-keeping began almost 400 years ago” and here we are, two years late for the solar minimum, and the sun the most quiescent in a very long time. A few Solar Cycle 24 sunspots appeared in January, but their number has been few and far between, with Solar Cycle 23 sunspots still appearing at a greater frequency than the 24 spots. The solar minimum is measured at the point in time where the spots of the new cycle out number the spots of the old cycle. It has been two months since the last Cycle 24 spot.

NASA is still standing by their already outdated April 2007 forecast.

The current sunspot number is 0.

I wonder when the Legacy Media will start to notice that the predictions of the Global Warming Religionists are not coming to pass?

Posted in CAGW, Global Ice Age, science | Leave a Comment »

Ashes To Ice

Posted by Thunder Pig on July 3, 2008

Here is a movie about the effort to reach Mars, culminating with the recent Phoenix Mission:

For more information, please visit the following websites:

Home page of the Phoenix Mars Mission

NASA’s Phoenix
page

And here is the live coverage of the Phoenix Landing as broadcast by space enthusiasts at Space Vid Cast:

Posted in Exploration, NASA, Online Media, science, space | Leave a Comment »

The Tunguska Mystery 100 Years Later

Posted by Thunder Pig on June 30, 2008

June 30, 1908, 7:14 a.m., central Siberia—Semen Semenov, a local farmer, saw “the sky split in two. Fire appeared high and wide over the forest…. From … where the fire was, came strong heat…. Then the sky shut closed, and a strong thump sounded, and I was thrown a few yards…. After that such noise came, as if . . . cannons were firing, the earth shook …”

Such is the harrowing testimony of one of the closest eyewitnesses to what scientists call the Tunguska event, the largest impact of a cosmic body to occur on the earth during modern human history. Semenov experienced a raging conflagration some 65 kilometers (40 miles) from ground zero, but the effects of the blast rippled out far into northern Europe and Central Asia as well. Some people saw massive, silvery clouds and brilliant, colored sunsets on the horizon, whereas others witnessed luminescent skies at night—Londoners, for instance, could plainly read newsprint at midnight without artificial lights. Geophysical observatories placed the source of the anomalous seismic and pressure waves they had recorded in a remote section of Siberia. The epicenter lay close to the river Podkamennaya Tunguska, an uninhabited area of swampy taiga forest that stays frozen for eight or nine months of the year.

Ever since the Tunguska event, scientists and lay enthusiasts alike have wondered what caused it. Although most observers generally accept that some kind of cosmic body, either an asteroid or a comet, exploded in the sky above Siberia, no one has yet found fragments of the object or any impact craters in the affected region. The mystery remains unsolved, but our research team, only the latest of a steady stream of investigators who have scoured the area, may be closing in on a discovery that will change our understanding of what happened that fateful morning.

Source: Scientific American
Related: Wikipedia
The Stupid: Rense Article “Great 1908 Tunguska Explosion – UFO Meets Comet?
The Nonsensical: The Vurdalak Conjecture

Tunguska Epicenter

I have enjoyed reading about this event all my life, and especially remember the wilder claims of the conspiracy nuts that it was an alien craft that had blown up in the atmosphere, or even the speculation that it was a tiny black hole that happened to evaporate as it intersected our atmosphere.

I have always believed it to have been a piece of a comet, more specifically, the short-period comet Encke. I forget where I read that, and a quick Google Search tells me that British Astronomer Fred Whipple suggested that in 1930. I read very heavily in the area of Astronomy, so I could have read that anywhere, and tend to go with the scientific explanation where it fits Occam’s Razor.

Posted in astronomy, history, mystery, science | Leave a Comment »

Crunching The Numbers On Algal Gasoline

Posted by Thunder Pig on June 28, 2008

According to the US Energy Information Administration, US gasoline consumption is currently averaging (4-week rolling) 9.027 million barrels of gasoline per day, or about 379 million gallons (42 gallons per barrel). Thus, to completely replace US gasoline consumption, Sapphire Energy would need to “scrub”, at 100% efficiency, just over 83000 cubic kilometers of air per day. Certainly there is plenty of air available – this volume represents less than 0.02% of the volume of air in the first 1 km of atmosphere. Nevertheless, it is an enormous amount to process each day.

Of course, Sapphire Energy’s near-term goals are much more modest. As CEO Jason Pyle told Biomass Magazine, “the company is currently deploying a three-year pilot process with the goal of opening a 153 MMgy (10,000 barrel per day) production facility by 2011 at a site yet to be determined.” Using my fuzzy math above, that equates to a minimum of 92 cubic kilometers of air a day. Still seems like a lot.

So where will all of the CO2 come from?

Source: Watts Up With That? (Be sure and read the whole post over there).

Commentary

This is the one thing enviro-weenies seem to forget when they try to force alternative energy on us…it is usually not scalable the way oil is scalable. They make good supplemental sources of energy, but cannot replace oil completely.

I am very interested to see more research in this direction for producing fuels from biological sources that are not also food sources. Al Fin has a post on a similar effort that boasts 100,000 gallons of oil an acre production, which leaves me to ponder the possibility of lefties and enviro-weenies (often the same creature) will begin to oppose that process should it promise to free us from bondage to the Middle East, and perhaps create true wealth here. If it is successful…count on it as surely as the protests against wind mills and clean coal plants…which they championed a few years ago.

Posted in al fin, Alternative Energy, Economy, Free Markets, Peak Oil Debunking, science | Leave a Comment »

No Warming For Last Eleven Years

Posted by Thunder Pig on June 20, 2008

Charts are included at Watts Up With That? that show no global warming for last eleven years, despite a continued increase in CO2 levels. Hmmm. No wonder lefties have been in a bad mood lately.

Al Fin has reported on the quiet Sun, which may be to blame for the recent slide of global temperatures, and we may be getting colder yet.

And, let me ask, where are the sunspots of Solar Cycle 24? And why are there so very few of them?

**update** 2.05pm

I forgot to add that there is already talk of calling the potential Solar Minimum we are entering the Landscheidt Minimum because he predicted it.

The more politically inclined among us might want to call it the Gore Minimum, or even the Gore-Hansen Minimum to mock those who were so very wrong about Global Warming, and man’s impact on global temperatures.

For more reading on Landscheidt, I suggest a series of five articles:

My Random March Through the Insanity of Solar Cycle Research (aka – Explanation of Landsheidt’s first paper, part 1)

Landscheidt Part 2

Landscheidt, Part 3

Landscheidt, Part 4 (Summary of Eddy’s “The Maunder Minimum”)

Landscheidt 5 (Review of Eddy’s “The Case of the Missing Sunspots”)

And most of his papers can be found at Landscheidt Cycles Research.

And, in all my “debates” with lefties one thing is very clear…despite all the evidence you may present them, they will always try to find another way to justify their attacks on Capitalism, Western Civilization, and try to get us to volunteer to change our lives to suit their political agenda.

Don’t let them. They are liars, and their ultimate goal is to destroy our way of life. And I will bet you something right now. When it starts to become obvious that the earth’s climate is going into a cooling cycle…they will continue their attacks on our way of life, despite being proven so utterly and completely wrong. That is one reason why they have started to refer to “Climate Change” instead of “Global Warming”.

I refer you to the excellent Gateway Pundit “Brrrr” series of posts chronicling the cooling earth. The latest one notes the record snowfall in Spokane, Washington!

Posted in al fin, Concepts, Global Ice Age, global warming, science, Solar Cycles | Leave a Comment »

(LIVE EVENT) 212th AAS Meeting in St. Louis

Posted by Thunder Pig on June 3, 2008

The wonderful people at Universe Today are providing a live feed of the conference today of the 212th AAS Meeting in St Louis today:

Posted in astronomy, Live Event, Online Media, science | Leave a Comment »

Live coverage of STS-124/Kibo Launch and Early Flight Updated With Replay Video

Posted by Thunder Pig on May 31, 2008

**updated** 5.50pm The replay of the show launch and the first few minutes of flight is now available:
Streaming Video by Ustream.TV
The continuing live coverage is below…

Courtesy Space Vidcast, You can watch coverage of the 123rd Shuttleflight, the 35th flight of the Discovery vehicle, and the delivery of the experimental JAXA Kibo pressurized module to the ISS. After this flight, there are only eight more flights to the ISS planned by NASA shuttles. This flight is anticipated to last 15 days, minus the time required to repair the toilet. If it’s anything like an earthly toilet repair, I hope they packed a lunch.

Free video streaming by Ustream

Click here to join the chatroom. Follow the chat rules, or you will be tossed.

The NASA Channel will be played on this channel, and the Live Show is scheduled to begin around 4 pm, give or take.

Buzz Lightyear will be making his first flight into space to the delight of children everywhere. NASA is hoping to encourage children to continue their interest in space.

Flightcrew for STS-124:

* Mark E. Kelly (3) – Commander
* Kenneth Ham (1) – Pilot
* Karen L. Nyberg (1) – Mission Specialist 1
* Ronald J. Garan, Jr. (1) – Mission Specialist 2
* Michael E. Fossum (2) – Mission Specialist 3
* Akihiko Hoshide (1) – Mission Specialist 4 – JAXA

Launching ISS Expedition 17 crew:

* Gregory Chamitoff (1) – Flight Engineer

Returning ISS Expedition 17 crew:

* Garrett Reisman (1) – Flight Engineer

The crewman’s name is followed by a number in parenthesis to indicate number of times the astronaut has flown in space prior to this mission, assignment, and if applicable, space agency other than NASA as their sponsor. JAXA is the Japanese Space Agency.

More information: NASA STS-124 webpage
Space Vid Cast Showpage

Posted in Human Spacefilght, Live Event, NASA, Online Media, science | Leave a Comment »