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Archive for the ‘NASA’ Category

July 20, 1969 "The Eagle Has Landed"

Posted by Thunder Pig on July 20, 2008

Apollo 11 was the first manned mission to land on the Moon. The first steps by humans on another planetary body were taken by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on July 20, 1969. The astronauts also returned to Earth the first samples from another planetary body. Apollo 11 achieved its primary mission – to perform a manned lunar landing and return the mission safely to Earth – and paved the way for the Apollo lunar landing missions to follow.
Find out more at Apollo 11.

Here’s how we’ll return to the Moon, this time to stay!

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Posted in Exploration, history, Human Spacefilght, NASA, science | Leave a Comment »

Ashes To Ice

Posted by Thunder Pig on July 3, 2008

Here is a movie about the effort to reach Mars, culminating with the recent Phoenix Mission:

For more information, please visit the following websites:

Home page of the Phoenix Mars Mission

NASA’s Phoenix
page

And here is the live coverage of the Phoenix Landing as broadcast by space enthusiasts at Space Vid Cast:

Posted in Exploration, NASA, Online Media, science, space | Leave a Comment »

SpaceVidCast Live Weekly Show for June 5th

Posted by Thunder Pig on June 6, 2008

I have been meaning to post this Live Show for longer than I would like to admit, and am just now getting around to it.

The show starts at 10pm Eastern Time, and I hope you enjoy it.

Until the show starts, you can watch NASA TV streamed right here.

Posted in citizen journalism, Human Spacefilght, NASA, Online Media, vlogcast | Leave a Comment »

Live coverage of STS-124/Kibo Launch and Early Flight Updated With Replay Video

Posted by Thunder Pig on May 31, 2008

**updated** 5.50pm The replay of the show launch and the first few minutes of flight is now available:
Streaming Video by Ustream.TV
The continuing live coverage is below…

Courtesy Space Vidcast, You can watch coverage of the 123rd Shuttleflight, the 35th flight of the Discovery vehicle, and the delivery of the experimental JAXA Kibo pressurized module to the ISS. After this flight, there are only eight more flights to the ISS planned by NASA shuttles. This flight is anticipated to last 15 days, minus the time required to repair the toilet. If it’s anything like an earthly toilet repair, I hope they packed a lunch.

Free video streaming by Ustream

Click here to join the chatroom. Follow the chat rules, or you will be tossed.

The NASA Channel will be played on this channel, and the Live Show is scheduled to begin around 4 pm, give or take.

Buzz Lightyear will be making his first flight into space to the delight of children everywhere. NASA is hoping to encourage children to continue their interest in space.

Flightcrew for STS-124:

* Mark E. Kelly (3) – Commander
* Kenneth Ham (1) – Pilot
* Karen L. Nyberg (1) – Mission Specialist 1
* Ronald J. Garan, Jr. (1) – Mission Specialist 2
* Michael E. Fossum (2) – Mission Specialist 3
* Akihiko Hoshide (1) – Mission Specialist 4 – JAXA

Launching ISS Expedition 17 crew:

* Gregory Chamitoff (1) – Flight Engineer

Returning ISS Expedition 17 crew:

* Garrett Reisman (1) – Flight Engineer

The crewman’s name is followed by a number in parenthesis to indicate number of times the astronaut has flown in space prior to this mission, assignment, and if applicable, space agency other than NASA as their sponsor. JAXA is the Japanese Space Agency.

More information: NASA STS-124 webpage
Space Vid Cast Showpage

Posted in Human Spacefilght, Live Event, NASA, Online Media, science | Leave a Comment »

MRO Takes Photo Of Phoenix With Parachute Deployed

Posted by Thunder Pig on May 26, 2008

Holy Photographic Feats, Batman!!!

The image faintly detects the chords attaching the backshell and parachute. The surroundings look dark, but correspond to the fully illuminated Martian surface, which is much darker than the parachute and backshell.

Phoenix released its parachute at an altitude of about 12.6 kilometers (7.8 miles) and a velocity of 1.7 times the speed of sound.

The HiRISE acquired this image on May 25, 2008, at 7:36 p.m. Eastern Time. It is a highly oblique view of the Martian surface, 26 degrees above the horizon, or 64 degrees from the normal straight-down imaging of Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The image has a scale of 0.76 meters per pixel.

Check out the rest of the story at Universe Today.

Is that not truly an awesome photo?

Posted in Exploration, NASA, science | Leave a Comment »

Seven Minutes Of Terror: Live Coverage Of Phoenix Landing On Mars Update—Phoenix Has Landed!

Posted by Thunder Pig on May 25, 2008

**update** 8.02 pm The Phoenix Has Landed, and so far, all is well. When Ben makes the recording available, I will post it in place of the live stream player so you can relive the event.

Replay of event:

Free Videos by Ustream.TV

Here is my preferred viewing for all things NASA, Space Vid Cast:

Phoenix is scheduled to touch down on the northern icy plains of Mars tonight. Confirmation of the landing could come as early as 7:53 p.m. EDT (4:53 p.m. PDT). Follow along on here during landing, the live coverage is expected to begin at 6pm. Until then, I have a few websites for you to peruse. Remember that Mars is about 15 Light Minutes away, so we won’t know what happens on Mars until 15 minutes later.

Phoenix Website

University of Arizona Website

**update** 5.21pm Phoenix is even on “Twitter“. Gag me with a spoon!

Time table (All Times pm Eastern)

7.16.00 Propulsion System Pressurization
7.39.17 Cruise Stage Separation
7.46.17 Enter Martian Atmosphere
7.49.57 Parachute Deploy
7.50.12 Heat Shield Jettison
7.52.50 Lander Separation
7.52.53 Descent thrusters Increase
7.53.33 Touchdown

Just remember, that we will have to wait for the radio signals to get from Mars to the Earth, and that will take several minutes.

Today’s snapshot of the Solar System as viewed from above:

Mars is red, and the Earth is blue Venus is white, Mercury is green, and the Sun is yellow in this picture. Photo courtesy Solar System Live.

Mars is about 171,400,000 miles from Earth, and since light travels at just over 186,000 miles per second…it will take the messages 921 seconds, or 15 and a third minutes to get here. This is also why most everything taking place on the lander is automated. There is no way we could course correct in time. If there were astronauts on this lander…they would have to wait over 30 minutes for a reply! That should give you an idea of how truly vast space is, and how tiny we are, and how far we have to go in the exploration of the universe.
Other places with live coverage on the internet may be found at NASA TV, Green Banks Telescope, and CNN Live w/ Miles O’Brien.

Here is a quick video update via youtube:


Here is a video of the launch of Phoenix, nine months ago:

Posted in Exploration, Live Event, NASA, science | Leave a Comment »

The Pacific Decadal Oscillation Has Switched To Cold

Posted by Thunder Pig on April 30, 2008

Brrrr!….sounds like more cool weather headed this way!

A cool-water anomaly known as La Niña occupied the tropical Pacific Ocean throughout 2007 and early 2008. In April 2008, scientists at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced that while the La Niña was weakening, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation—a larger-scale, slower-cycling ocean pattern—had shifted to its cool phase.

This image shows the sea surface temperature anomaly in the Pacific Ocean from April 14–21, 2008. The anomaly compares the recent temperatures measured by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) on NASA’s Aqua satellite with an average of data collected by the NOAA Pathfinder satellites from 1985–1997. Places where the Pacific was cooler than normal are blue, places where temperatures were average are white, and places where the ocean was warmer than normal are red.

The cool water anomaly in the center of the image shows the lingering effect of the year-old La Niña. However, the much broader area of cooler-than-average water off the coast of North America from Alaska (top center) to the equator is a classic feature of the cool phase of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). The cool waters wrap in a horseshoe shape around a core of warmer-than-average water. (In the warm phase, the pattern is reversed).

Source: Watt’s Up With That?
Hat Tip: NC Media Watch
More Info: PDO
Solar Influence: Al Fin
Gateway Pundit: Brrrr!
Research Paper: Is Climate Sensitive to Solar Variability?

Despite what lefties say, the evidence is mounting, and the world is getting colder, which will be a disaster for mankind as growing seasons grow shorter, and as idiot lefties advocate burning food as fuel. And, as Jerry Pournelle points out, England did go from having Deciduous Trees to a 100 foot thick ice sheet in just a hundred years.

Posted in CAGW, disaster, Global Ice Age, NASA, science | Leave a Comment »

Live Coverage of STS-123 Landing

Posted by Thunder Pig on March 26, 2008

(The live-feed has now been replaced with a recording of the landing)
(And you may have to press the refresh button next to the play button)
(in order to get the video to start playing [TP 2008 0327 11.45 am])

Watch the live coverage here of the landing of the Shuttle Endeavour as STS-123 comes to a close. Or, if you wanna chat with other people while watching, head on over to Space Vidcast and join the group.

The first attempt was waved off, so we’ll have to see what happens the next go around.

Posted in Human Spacefilght, NASA, science, space | Leave a Comment »

STS-123 Live Coverage

Posted by Thunder Pig on March 16, 2008

I have live coverage of the current shuttle mission (STS-123) on West Carolina Report that will operate at a lower bandwidth than the NASA/Yahoo! coverage. The coverage is courtesy Spacevidcast.

If there are no live events, the feed will consist of replays of the most recent activities, especially helpful since most of the activity in this mission appears to be happening at night.

Posted in Live Event, NASA, science, space, West Carolina Report | Leave a Comment »

Shuttle Endeavour Lifts Off

Posted by Thunder Pig on March 11, 2008

I gotta make it down to Florida to watch one of these take off before they retire the shuttles!

This is a playlist providing a 5 minute overview of the current mission, a 2 and a half minute launch video, and a third video lasting about 38 seconds show the beautiful night launch from the Vehicle Assembly Building.

Space shuttle Endeavour thundered into orbit early Tuesday morning carrying seven astronauts and Japan’s dreams for a space-based laboratory at the International Space Station.

“This is a great launch and a real tribute to the team to get it ready to go fly,” said Bill Gerstenmaier, NASA’s associate administrator for Space Operations.

The STS-123 mission started with a rare night launch for Endeavour’s crew, commanded by veteran astronaut Dominic Gorie. Gregory H. Johnson served as Pilot. The mission specialists for the flight are an international mix of experienced and first-time crew members. Robert L. Behnken, Mike Foreman, Rick Linnehan, Garrett Reisman and Japanese astronaut Takao Doi all have critical roles during the 16-day mission by Endeavour.


NASA Endeavour Page

Photo Courtesy NASA

Posted in NASA, science, space | Leave a Comment »